NTSB RELEASES SPEEDING-RELATED CRASH REPORT

The US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has released Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes Involving Passenger Vehicles, its full examination of the causes of and trends in speeding-related passenger vehicle crashes. It focuses on five safety issues that pertain to effective countermeasures for speeding: speed limits, data-driven approaches for speed enforcement, automated speed enforcement, intelligent speed adaptation, and national leadership. Download: https://bit.ly/2uPpnwJ  (.pdf)

THE NEW TRAFFIC SAFETY PARADIGM

A new traffic safety paradigm is changing how planning professionals measure traffic risks and evaluate potential safety strategies. A report covering the approach has been released by the Victoria Transport Policy Institute (VTPI). It recognizes that all vehicle travel imposes risks, so planning decisions that increase vehicle travel tend to increase crashes, and vehicle travel reduction strategies increase traffic safety. It also recognizes that it is infeasible to reduce high-risk driving without providing viable alternatives. This expands the range of potential traffic safety strategies to include multi-modal planning, transportation demand management, and Smart Growth policies. See: The New Traffic Safety Paradigm. (pdf) https://bit.ly/2IzvasV

FINAL RULE BROADENS TRAVEL TYPES STATES MUST CONSIDER

Before leaving his post as Secretary of Transportation, Anthony Foxx issued a regulation that could, if implemented, profoundly affect surface transportation: The National Performance Management Measures; Assessing Performance of the National Highway System, Freight Movement on the Interstate System, and Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program. The regulation made several changes that help broaden the types of travel that states have to consider. First, both the National Highway Performance Program (NHPP) and the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) rule now include consideration of reduction in CO2 emissions caused by the highway system. Second, the NHPP measure now considers “person-miles” traveled, rather than just vehicle miles traveled. Third, the CMAQ performance rule includes a measure of how many people travel by modes other than a single-occupancy vehicle.

With the new rule, FHWA is looking to transportation planners on the state level and in major metropolitan areas to consider all types of travel as they attempt to relieve traffic congestion and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. See:  https://bit.ly/2qcKHHp

HOPEMAN, SCOTLAND: RESIDENTS POINT HAIRDRYERS AT SPEEDERS

BBC News reports that villagers, including school children, in Hopeman, Scotland, are wearing fluorescent vests and pointing hairdryers at cars to mimic police using speed cameras to deter fast drivers. Some drivers are reaching speeds of up to 60mph as they travel through the area. The resident’s actions have caught the attention of the police, who say they are addressing the situation. https://bbc.in/2lL8s8L

FHWA-FTA REPORT $926 BILLION NEEDED IN INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT

The FHWA and FTA jointly released the “2015 Status of the Nation’s Highways, Bridges and Transit: Conditions and Performance” report to Congress. The report estimates that the backlog of needed highway and transit infrastructure projects has reached $926 billion. The report provides decision makers with an objective appraisal of the physical conditions, operational performance, and financing mechanisms of highways, bridges, and transit systems based on both their current state and their projected future state under a set of alternative future investment scenarios.  https://bit.ly/2jdTAfc